My Favourite Food

Food is another big love of my life and it is the one constant that I have needed since birth and I’ll need until I die. I think that’s a beautiful sentiment, don’t you?

Food can be creative too! You start with all these basic food stuffs that have come from the earth and the planet, then you mix them together in a way that makes you happy and in the end, you have something tasty and individual to eat and enjoy. Real life art.

Singaporean Food

Being a Singaporean at heart, it makes sense that I would have a strong connection and a strong love for the food. After all, it is one of the best cuisines in the world! Just like the country that spawned it, Singaporean food is rich in diversity and is born from several ethnic groups that call the motherland home. Our fantastic food is a part of our national identity and is the centrepiece for most of our activities and gatherings.

I love cooking and try my hardest to experiment and try new things. I have to admit my Singapore dishes are infinitely better than my British ones – I have my mother to thank for that! So here are a few of the dishes I’ve perfected and love to cook all the time.

Fish Head Curry

It’s not as gross as it sounds, honestly! Sure, there is a fish head on your plate, but it is so tasty! It’s also a perfect blend of cultures, with the Chinese delicacy of a fish head and the spices of South Indian curry mixing together for a real packed punch.

It can even be customised any way that you want to make it fit your palette! If you want it creamy, add coconut milk, if you want it a bit more sour, add tamarind paste for an extra punch.

It actually was created by an India restaurant in the 60s to appease the Chinese diners and it was so popular that it spread to all corners of the island.

Kaya Toast

I LOVE Kaya toast. It is so sweet but with a savoury crunch. You don’t know how great it is until you try it. It can be eaten at any time of day and is perfect with tea or coffee.

It is so easy to make as well. Grilled pieces of toast with cold butter, coconut jam and runny eggs. That’s it! I add a splash of dark soy sauce and pepper and it really tops it off well.

It’s actually a pretty trendy dish and a lot of teenagers eat it as street food while they’re skateboarding in the city centre.

Laksa

Laksa is the best broth EVER. It’s a noodle soup that’s spicy and creamy and heavenly on the taste buds. There are a fair few variations but I make mine with tamarind paste for a bit of a tangy taste, but it ALWAYS has thick vermicelli noodles, coconut milk and shrimp.

British Food

I like to think of myself as culturally diverse, but when I first moved to the UK I thought all the food was WEIRD. I love it now though, everything is so filling and hearty and THICK. It took me longer than it should have but I am finally an aficionado of British food.

Chicken Tikka Masala

DON’T be fooled by the fact tikka masala is served in Indian restaurants. There is nothing Indian about tikka masala. It was invented in England and has never even heard of India.

That doesn’t mean it’s not tasty though! I don’t know how British people managed it, but it is actually one of the best curries I’ve ever tasted (depending on where you get it from/how you make it!)

It’s bright orange and not too spicy, I like to add in a bit of cream just to thicken it up and make the sauce go further and trust me, you will want the sauce to go as far as you can make it reach.

Fish and Chips

Another British culinary success that constantly baffles me. The worst fish in the world is covered in pancake batter and deep fried to within an inch of its life and served on a bed of thick chips.

But it is SO good. It’s a little bit greasy and a little bit bland, but once you cover it in vinegar and salt, it transforms into a heavenly dish. Perfect. You can even make it fancy and dress it up real nice.

Steak and Ale Pudding

I have never seen a steak and ale pudding anywhere else in the world. I first tried it at a pub in Derbyshire, in the middle of a tiny village. It is basically a pie made from suet pastry – a squidgy pastry made from animal fat.

There is tonnes of gravy, meat and flavour in these puddings, but be warned they are very filling! I only ever seem to get through half because, although they can be small, there is so much substance packed into each one that the tiniest bit goes a long way.